Buddhism and psychedelic exploration share a common concern: the liberation of the mind. Zig Zag Zen: Buddhism and Psychedelics is a landmark anthology that launches the first serious inquiry into the moral, ethical, doctrinal, and transcendental considerations of the intersection of Buddhism and psychedelics. Through numerous essays and interviews by such luminaries as Joan Halifax Roshi, Peter Matthiessen, Jack Kornfield, as well as visionary art by Odilon Redon, Mark Rothko, Alex Grey, and more. Zig Zag Zen is a provocative and thoughtful exploration of inner states and personal transformation.

Buddhism and psychedelic exploration share a common concern: the liberation of the mind. Zig Zag Zen: Buddhism and Psychedelics is a landmark anthology that launches the first serious inquiry into the moral, ethical, doctrinal, and transcendental considerations of the intersection of Buddhism and psychedelics. Through numerous essays and interviews by such luminaries as Joan Halifax Roshi, Peter Matthiessen, Jack Kornfield, as well as visionary art by Odilon Redon, Mark Rothko, Alex Grey, and more. Zig Zag Zen is a provocative and thoughtful exploration of inner states and personal transformation.

vicemag
vicemag:


Should everyone take acid?No because you have to ask the right question to take it. Do you want a one-on-one with your maker?

And what if the answer is yes, even if you’ve got a mental illness?Well there’s a correlation between acid and curing mental illness. I realized after my beautiful accidental rebirth that what we usually call psychology is actually just art.
You use a lot of complicated metaphors.No, I just use the truth.

—Mark McCloud, the San Francisco man who has 30,000 tabs of LSD in his house, sounds exactly like you’d expect

vicemag:

Should everyone take acid?
No because you have to ask the right question to take it. Do you want a one-on-one with your maker?

And what if the answer is yes, even if you’ve got a mental illness?
Well there’s a correlation between acid and curing mental illness. I realized after my beautiful accidental rebirth that what we usually call psychology is actually just art.

You use a lot of complicated metaphors.
No, I just use the truth.

—Mark McCloud, the San Francisco man who has 30,000 tabs of LSD in his house, sounds exactly like you’d expect